Wednesday, November 24, 2010

What Grandma Made


When I married, the possibility of becoming a grandmother never occurred to me. Never. Entered. My. Mind.



But sometime early in the new year that reality will be here. And with it has been unleashed a torrent of, well, grandmother type behaviour, like knitting and sewing baby stuff.



And too, the stark realization that the person who knows more about this than I, is no longer here. I could really use her help just getting it all done. I want to knit it all. Ha!



I have her books. Stacks and stacks of her books. Her needles. Her stash. My stash. I bought the McCall's Needlework magazine above in 1978, expecting to someday make a bunting for my babies. But just like the magazine predicted, it was Grandma who knit the bunting instead.



I even have some of her UFO's - UnFinished Objects - not all her fault. That little hooded sweater up-top? Violinist's. I was supposed to finish the front with crochet. She knit. I crocheted.


Instead, the other day I pulled it out from the same bag she handed to me maybe eighteen years ago with instructions, "Here, I'd rather knit, can you do the crochet?" I held it close to my face. I could smell her. Yes, I'll do the crochet.

13 comments:

Patricia said...

Congratulations!!!! What joy! And what a lucky little one to have a grandma like you!!!

We're expecting our first granddaughter the end of December. Looks like we will both be deep in baby love this year.

Tanya said...

Very sensitive and subtle. Brought tears to my eyes and made me feel just a little ashamed that I had inwardly gritted my teeth in frustration with Mum's neediness this week.

Dave Atkinson said...

Wonderful post and wonderful news!

My sister inherited my grandmother's quilting stuff, including her scrap bag with a lifetime's worth of wonderful and tacky fabric. When our youngest was born, my sister made us a quilt exclusively with this fabric, using one of my grandmother's trademark patterns.

It SMELLED of grandma, but had the hand of my sister. I love crafts that can be passed on.

Homeschool on the Croft said...

Well, all I can say is that Grandmas just don't look like they used to look when I was growing up!
Congratulations, and happy knitting/crocheting/finishing!

Adeena said...

That is the cutest sweater! :)

And I love the baby bunting bag pattern.

I don't know if you know this, but there's a great site for knitting/crocheting that I love - ravelry.com Lots of forums, free patterns, etc.

There's nothing like that new baby smell. Happy for you!

Decadent Housewife said...

Tanya, I gasped and teared up when taking the sweater from the bag. It was like she was standing right there.

Words,
"Wonderful and tacky fabric" made me smile.

Adeena,
Found ravelry just this past week.
Not sure if that's a good or bad thing.

Croft Homeschooler,
The photo is a few years old - I'm a little more wrinkled now.

Jeanne said...

How beautiful and lovely is all that you share
Love Jeanne♥

Leila said...

Very sweet post. It's hard to believe that time goes on in this particular way!
Congratulations! And I'm experiencing the same crafting gridlock...don't know how to resolve it at the moment.
XOXO

Mental P Mama said...

Awwwww! This is wonderful...what a beautiful tribute to those past and those to come....

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Anonymous said...

What a lovely column. I have a knitting story too.

About five years ago, a lovely lady from our church passed away. She had been a prodigious knitter and left as one of her UFO's a beautiful beige aran pattern sweater.

All the pieces were there, it just needed to be assembled and have someone knit around the collar and find some buttons. Bravely (foolishly?) volunteered to do the job. When I was finished, the sweater looked fine.

Only two problems -- it was wool and our family is allergic to it, and it was small -- not small enough for a child, but definitely too small for any of my rather large Norwegian family members.

After some deliberation, I gave it to a dear little nun I knew, a Sister of St. of Peace. She adored the sweater and wore it for years.

It was a very satisfying project, and proved to me that the time my beloved aunt Sadie spent trying to teach me to knit all those years ago wasn't wasted after all. Since then, I've been knitting on a more or less regular basis.

I hope you and yours will have a wonderful Christmas, Canadian Chickadee

Anonymous said...

What a lovely column. I have a knitting story too.

About five years ago, a lovely lady from our church passed away. She had been a prodigious knitter and left as one of her UFO's a beautiful beige aran pattern sweater.

All the pieces were there, it just needed to be assembled and have someone knit around the collar and find some buttons. Bravely (foolishly?) volunteered to do the job. When I was finished, the sweater looked fine.

Only two problems -- it was wool and our family is allergic to it, and it was small -- not small enough for a child, but definitely too small for any of my rather large Norwegian family members.

After some deliberation, I gave it to a dear little nun I knew, a Sister of St. of Peace. She adored the sweater and wore it for years.

It was a very satisfying project, and proved to me that the time my beloved aunt Sadie spent trying to teach me to knit all those years ago wasn't wasted after all. Since then, I've been knitting on a more or less regular basis.

I hope you and yours will have a wonderful Christmas, Canadian Chickadee

sleeplessnights04 said...

You're going to love being a grandma just ask our mums :o)